Selling As a Spiritual Practice


What? Did I just write the words “selling” and “spiritual” in the same sentence? Are you sure you read that correctly?

Yep. You did.

Some of the things I hear most frequently when talking to people about Team Northrup are “I can’t sell,” “I’m not a sales person, or “I don’t like to sell.” My questions for them are: “Have you ever listened to someone tell you about something that’s missing for them, something they long for, or something they’re dissatisfied with? Have you ever offered solicited advice, direction, or welcome suggestions? Have you ever successfully communicated with another human being with the purpose of getting your point across to them because you knew that it would help them?” If your answer to any or all of these questions is ‘yes’, then I’m here to tell you you’ve sold something —and you’re good at it.

I’ve always been good at selling, but I haven’t always viewed it in positive light. The man who turned me around on selling is named —ironically, synchronistically or bizarrely, depending on your perspective —Tim Sales. Yep, this is his real name. Tim defines selling as, “communicating a concept, idea, or desire.” When I heard that for the first time it made me take a long, deep exhale and I felt myself completely relax. If, in fact, sales is simply communication, it leaves the land of smarmy, pushy, trying to get people to do something they don’t want to do that isn’t good for them anyway, and enters the land of listening, softening, heart-opening service. Rather than being stressful and pressured, it becomes easy and fun. We all know that good communication is at the heart of any strong relationship and I also teach that good communication and a genuine desire to make somebody’s life better are at the heart of any strong business. (If you’re in sales in any way —and I would argue that everyone on the planet is —check out Tim Sales’ Professional Inviter and Brilliant Communicator.)

So where does the spiritual part come in? For me, the term “spiritual” is slippery and sticky. It’s hard for me to define in words but easy to recognize in emotion. It’s ephemeral, beyond description, and beautiful. It often has to do with connecting with another human being on a deep level when I feel I’m being of service. On Team Northrup we practice a conscious business model and one of our values is redefining sales as service. This means having a deep belief in what you’re offering and trusting that those who genuinely need and desire what you have will find you. It means telling the truth. It means listening to what someone is telling you and then offering information only when it’s directly connected to something they’ve stated they need, want, or don’t want. It means having a clear agenda and path that you are walking with conviction and knowing that your path doesn’t always have to be everyone else’s path. It means celebrating when your path intersects with the perfect customers, business partners, and associates. It means celebrating just as vigorously when it turns out what you have isn’t a good fit for someone because your time and energy is then freed up to serve those who are truly looking for exactly what you have.

This definition of sales as service requires that you are offering something you truly love and believe in. If you ever find yourself feeling like you’re pushing, feeling sleazy, or not able to communicate effectively about what you’ve got, take a pause and make sure you are deeply invested in your product, service, or idea. If not, give yourself permission to toss it and move on. The energy saved will be invaluable. I used to be a professional Feng Shui practitioner and I made a lot of money and had a lot of fun doing it at first. But, about a year after I started my practice I noticed my energy around it waning. When the phone rang for a consultation I began to get annoyed. I was procrastinating around returning calls and doing consultation follow-ups. I was no longer fueled. Even though I had spent a pretty penny on designing a website and I had networked my tush off around this business, I gave myself permission to stop marketing it. And you know what? Team Northrup has increased its revenue by over 60% and now I have a new online presence. All is as it should be because I gave myself permission to let something go when I was no longer feeling it.

I promise, when you’re offering something that is authentically aligned with your beliefs and values and you have a genuine desire to help and/or inspire another human being to improve his/her life, selling becomes a spiritual practice. It feels really, really good. And it makes the world a better place. Give it a go and keep me posted.

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9 Responses to Selling As a Spiritual Practice

  1. I love this Kate! You have captured it so beautifully! I relate to your words about selling versus communicating or sharing. When I believe in something with my whole heart there is no “selling” only a genuine desire to share it with others so that they can experience a product or service that I truly believe will help them. What they choose to do with the information I shared is up to them.

    My life is my spiritual practice and I am eternally grateful for you and Team Northrup for providing an opportunity for me to be surrounded by genuine, loving and inspiring women and men. I am so glad you are haring your wisdom through writing and I look forward to reading more. Hugs, Sue

  2. Kate WOW I wanted to highlight a key part of your message for me. I’m going to paraphrase, to celebrate just as vigorously when what you are offering or selling is not a good fit that it frees up energy to serve some else who really wants and needs what you have to offer. YES this makes so much sense and yet I have had the experience of feeling bad it wasn’t a fit which is energy I could have used in a different way. I love the practice of being so in alignment with your product or service that letting go of someone who isn’t a good fit is celebratory for you and them and keeps you open to be attracted to another person in a rather easy and spiritual way. Thank you for daring to propose that selling can be both spiritual and celebratory no matter what the outcome it’s an opportunity to play with the energy of spirit.
    Your fan
    Rachel

  3. Thank you for this! I love the words you share around vigorous celebrating when you’ve helped someone, no matter their direction. There is faith involved, ‘letting go and letting God.’ Or ‘good orderly direction’ as Julia Cameron says. I love Team Northrup for many reasons, including the opportunities to stretch beyond self-imposed limitations, and always know I have the foundation of a strong community of support… kinda like church.

  4. This is beautifully written. And articulates a new way of doing business that has the potential to change the world. Thank you for posting this gem. And for sharing your light with the world so beautifully. Love, Mom

  5. Just as I have agreed with myself to sell myself and everything I have always been, I read this message. Perfect is its effect upon my growing confidence in the release of the product line of Khalil. Masterful written Kate, your post adheres living wisdom to the internal recording mechanism in all of us who are open and willing to listen. Thank you beautiful, beautiful Kate.

  6. Kate, this is such a great reminder. If we are truly aligned with our purpose and in service, it is much easier to make these offerings to people. I think this is why I can love my work so much. It feel so good to have the tools to offer people who are screaming our for them, and to know that they are of the highest integrity. Thanks for the reminders.

  7. Kate, thanks for your post.

    I like how you framed selling as an spiritually-aligned practice. By incorporating an occupation with spiritual component, you allow sellers to feel complete as a person. There is no ounce of “us” vs. “them” in that philosophy.

    This helps us offer ourselves as sellers that perform acts of service instead of selfishness. I must say that this is much different than the “techniques” meant to trick people that I encountered in the beginning of my sales career.

    I hope that by staying true to myself through the selling process and I can be a happier and more enthusiastic seller.

    I can’t wait to read more.

    Thank you,
    Stefanie Ream-Blackham

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